What is a stimpmeter in golf

what is a stimpmeter in golf

A Putting Green's "Stimp" or "Stimp Rating"

Apr 09,  · A Stimpmeter is a simple tool used to measure the speed of putting greens: how easily a golf ball rolls across the surface of the green. The Stimpmeter is a very low-tech device, essentially just a small metal ramp that is angled down to a flat part of a putting green. Stimpmeter was further modified in (patent pending) to account for undu - lating putting greens where the previous Stimpmeter could not be used. The Stimpmeter is a simple, accurate device to measure green speed. It has proven to be an invaluable asset to the game of golf, both for daily play and championshipFile Size: 2MB.

A Stimpmeter is a simple tool used to measure the speed of putting greens : how easily a golf ball rolls across the surface of the green. The How to wear knee highs is a very low-tech device, essentially just a small metal ramp that is angled down to a flat part of a putting green. How far the golf ball rolls across the stipmmeter results in the "Stimp rating" of the green.

Stimp ratings in the single digits are considered slow to moderate-paced greens; Stimp ratings in the double digits are considered quick to fast greens.

Here are some specifics about how whqt Stimpmeter is built and works:. How far the ball rolls before stopping becomes the " Stimp rating ," indicating green speed. If the golf ball rolls nine feet, the Stimp rating is 9; if it rolls 11 feet, the green speed rates at You might have noticed that "Stimpmeter" is capitalized; that's because stimpmmeter word is an eponym.

That is, its name comes from the name of its inventor. The inventor of the Stimpmeter was Edward S. Stimpson was an accomplished amateur golfer; he won the Stimpemter Amateur Championship in And that was the same year Stimpson invented the simple tool for determining green speeds that bear his name. After watching golfers who were flummoxed by the speeds of the greens how to sight read faster the U.

Open at Oakmont Country ClubStimpson realized that golf course superintendents needed a way to measure green speeds in order to ensure that each green on a golf course rolled at how to get a big forearm same speed.

Stimpson created his original Stimpmeter inand some golf courses began using it here and there soon after. Inthe Stimpmeter was finally adopted by the USGA for use at golf courses around the United States, and the American governing body began making them available to courses, along with instructing superintendents in their use. The Stimpmeter's use spread around the world in the years after.

The Stimpmeter was essentially unchanged for decades after its invention. But ina small modification was made to take into account the fact that modern putting greens sometimes don't have flat areas large enough to allow a full roll-out by a golf ball released from a Stimpmeter. Os there is another notch on the reverse side of the Stimpmeter, halfway down the ramp. The process is the same, but the golf ball rolls half ia far when this notch is used.

The superintendent then doubles the result—if the ball rolls 5 feet using this option, the green speed s a Brent Kelley. Brent Kelley is an award-winning stimpmeetr journalist and golf expert with over 30 years what is a stimpmeter in golf print and online journalism. Updated Syimpmeter 09, LiveAbout uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By using LiveAbout, you accept our.

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Apr 05,  · What is a stimpmeter and how does it work? A stimpmeter is useful for greenkeepers to be able to check the pace of their greens. This is particularly important at links venues where strong winds can occasionally make overly fast greens unplayable. Being able to test and then adjust the green speed is a way of ensuring the greens are playable funlovestory.com: Neil Tappin. Aug 13,  · A stimpmeter helps measure the speed of the greens, but only if used correctly. First, you need to find a pretty flat part of the green. Obviously, if it’s significantly downhill or uphill, it will affect the reading, so finding a flat part of the putting surface is required. A Stimpmeter is a simple device used to measure the speed of a putting green. It is a three-foot (36 inches) long extruded aluminum bar with a V-shaped groove extending its entire length. At one end of the bar is a little notch for placing the ball, positioned approximately 30 inches .

A Stimpmeter is a simple device used to measure the speed of a putting green. It is a three-foot 36 inches long extruded aluminum bar with a V-shaped groove extending its entire length. At one end of the bar is a little notch for placing the ball, positioned approximately 30 inches from the end that rests on the ground. The ground-end of the device is tapered to reduce bounce as the ball makes contact with the green.

The purpose of this device is to apply a gravitational velocity to the ball, allowing it to roll along the green, the distance of which is then measured to get a green-speed reading. At a glance, the Stimpmeter appears to be somewhat primitive compared to other golfing equipment and devices.

It contains no fancy technology, and can hardly be described as scientific. It carries out a simple — but very important — function, allowing groundskeepers to easily and reliably get a reading of their greens. A green that is too fast or too slow can have a dramatic impact on play, so by carrying out Stimpmeter readings, groundskeepers are able to make necessary adjustments before the players show up.

You start by finding a flat piece of green and placing a golf ball in the notch of the Stimpmeter. Then, keeping the other end to the ground, you slowly raise the ball end. When the device reaches an angle of about 22 degrees, gravity will cause the ball to be released from the notch. The ball will then roll down the bar, with the trough keeping it on track.

The ball will then exit the ramp and roll along the green. Using a tape measure from the base of the Stimpmeter where it is touching the ground , you measure the distance the ball rolled in feet. You do this three times and calculate the average. Then, you turn the device around and get another three measurements in the opposite direction. This is to account for slight changes in slope and grain which affect the speed of the green. You then add your two average readings together and divide them by two.

This gives you your Stimpmeter reading. A typical golf club usually aims for a Stimpmeter reading of 9 or This is generally considered to be the goldilocks zone of green speeds; not too fast, not too slow. Some greens in some competitions can creep as high as 13, 14, or even 15 , which is crazy fast. At Augusta National , the beautiful, uniquely challenging home of the Masters, things work a little differently. The reason for this is because every hole at Augusta has its own distinctively unique character.

The size, sloping, contour, and shaping of each green is meticulously designed, and the speeds of individual putting surfaces are intentionally faster or slower than others. The Augusta grounds crew know how fast each of their greens need to be — a published Stimpmeter reading would be a reductive analysis of the state of their greens.

The Stimpmeter is named after Edward S. Stimpson, an accomplished amateur golfer who created a simple but lasting legacy of green speed reading. In , Stimpson, the Massachusetts state amateur champion and former Harvard golf team captain, was spectating the US Open at Oakmont. After witnessing one of the top pros roll a putt of the green, Stimpson was convinced that the greens were too fast — and he wanted to prove it.

He developed a device made out of wood which would come to be known as the Stimpmeter. In , the stimpmeter was finally adopted by the United States Golf Association USGA as an official device; it was redesigned to be made from aluminum and was first officially used during the US Open at Atlanta. In , the Stimpmeter was modified to include a second notch, located halfway up the bar on the reverse side. When using the halfway notch, the process of getting a stimp reading remains the same, only the distances recorded are doubled to get the final result.

Other than that, the design of the stimpmeter remains more or less unchanged. Thanks to Stimpson, ground keepers everywhere have a reliable way of monitoring green speeds, allowing a more regulated and balanced playing field across the world of golf. Nick Lomas is the founder of GolfSpan, an avid golfer, not quite a pro but has over years of experience playing and coaching golfers from all over the world.

His mission is to bring the golfing community a better experience then it comes to choosing the right golf gear, and finding the right set up for your game. GolfSpan is a blog run by golf enthusiasts, dedicated to bringing you the very best from the golfing community. From gear and equipment reviews to featured courses, WITB interviews, and the latest tournament updates.

Contact us: admin golfspan. Get updates directly to your inbox on our regular competitions, giveaways and new content and gear reviews. What, exactly, is a Stimpmeter, and how does it work? Contents What Is a Stimpmeter? How Does a Stimpmeter Work? What is Considered a Good Stimpmeter Reading? How Fast are the Masters Greens? Who Invented the Stimpmeter?

Final Thoughts Related Articles. Nick Lomas. All rights reserved.

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