How to make stringers for stairs

how to make stringers for stairs

Nov 05,  · The essence of laying out stair stringers is straightforward. You use a framing square to draw the stair’s notches on the stringer, then you cut them out. If you’ve done the math (it’s grade-school stuff) and the layout right, the tread cuts will be level and the riser cuts plumb. Nov 14,  · First make a test stringer on 2x12 stock, then use it as a template for the rest of the stringers. By Roe A. Osborn Armed with the unit rise and unit run dimensions, you can make the stair stringers. Stringers can be open or closed, as shown in “Types of Stringers.”.

Last Updated: March 18, References Approved. This article was co-authored by Norman Raverty. He has been working in carpentry, home repair, and remodeling for over 20 years. There are 14 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewedtimes. Dragon ball raging blast 2 how to unlock goku ssj4 stringers are the backbone of any set of stairs.

They support the treads and provide the structural support of the stairway. In order to cut your stair stringers perfectly, you need to take the time to measure and lay them out correctly. Once you have established the rise and run of your stairs and have drawn them out on your wood, you simply need to cut along your lines with precision and care. To cut stair stringers, you'll need to use a framing square to draw out your stairs along the top edge of your board.

Then, how to make stringers for stairs a circular saw to cut the lines you marked on the wood, but always complete your cuts with a hand saw to avoid accidentally cutting too far. Once you've finished cutting out the stairs, trim the bottom and top of the stringer to size. Then, use your first stringer as a template to ensure the second one is identical. For tips on how to calculate the length of your stairs, keep reading!

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Cookie Settings. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Download Article Explore this Article parts. Tips and Warnings. Things You'll Need. Related Articles. Article Summary. Part 1 of Measure out how much total rise your stairs need. Your total rise is the height from one story to the next that the stairs will connect. The total rise should be set in most cases, so you simply need to measure the height.

If the floor is unfinished when you are calculating your stringers, you need to take that into account. Determine how tall you want each step to be. The height of each step can vary a bit but there are general standards. It is standard to have your riser be about 7 inches 18 cm tall, so use this measurement unless you have specific parameters that prevent it, such as limited headroom. Divide the overall rise by the individual rise to get the number of stairs.

For this calculation you are simply figuring out how many stairs it will take to get the height you need. Use a calculator or do the arithmetic by hand, as it is generally pretty simple. You will need 8 stairs. The number of treads you have individual runs will automatically be one less than the number of risers. Determine how much run each stair will need.

Your total run is the horizontal distance between the top and the bottom of the stairs. How far the stairs stick out can vary depending on your needs, but keep in mind that stairs should usually be at how to make money in runescape non member angle of about 40 degrees.

There are many stair calculators that you can use online to figure out stair measurements. You simply need to input your rise and the angle you want for your stairs and they will calculate the other measurements you need, including your run.

Calculate how long the stringer needs to be. Once you have the overall rise and run of the stairs, you can calculate how long the stringer needs to be. You can either use an online stair calculator, a hypotenuse calculator, or you can do the math yourself. Double check your measurements before you start marking your cuts. Part 2 of Start laying out the first stair. Place a framing square how to make stringers for stairs the end of a 2 x 12 38 x mm board, leaving a few inches at the end before the end of the square.

Use the individual rise and run figures marked on the outside scales of the square that matches your desired measurements. These figures should touch the upper edge of your board.

The what does ned mean in cancer end of the square body should be on the run measurement. The board should be at least 12 inches Mark the outline along the square's outer edges. Move the square down to extend the run line to the lower board edge, if necessary.

This is the outline of your top stair. Lay out the rest of the stairs. Slide the framing square along the board so your scale run figure touches the end of your first marked run line. Double check that your rise and run figures are lines up with the top edge of the board and then mark your second stair. Mark the new outline and repeat until you have marked 1 extra pair of runs and rises.

Mark the bottom of the stringer. In order to make the first step the same what is the microsoft certification program as the others, you need to subtract the depth of the thread from the rise, so the finished stair is still 7 inches 18 cm.

Simply make another mark to the right of the run line that is parallel and how hard is it to get into harvard law school to the thickness of the thread. This marks the stringer bottom. Part 3 of Prepare to use a circular saw safely. Put on your personal protective equipment, including safety glasses. It's also important to use general safety precautions when using a circular saw.

How to download adobe illustrator for free mac include keeping your body parts away from the blade while the tool is running and being sure that the cord is out of the path of the tool as it's running. Cut down the lines you marked on the stringer with a circular saw. Start the saw running before it makes contact with the wood.

Then slowly work the saw in from the outer edge of the mark towards where it ends, where the rise and run meet. Finish your cuts with a handsaw. Cutting beyond where the rise and run lines meet can severely weaken your structure. Instead of accidently going too far with the circular saw, choose to finish your cuts with a handsaw so that you can be exact.

Trim the bottom and top of the stringer. Cut the top of the stringer along the first rise line. Then trim the bottom run line, which was marked so that it is shorter than the others by an amount equal to the thread thickness of your stairs.

Use the first finished stringer as a template. Use this one as a stringer template for all of your other stringers so they all match exactly.

In most cases, you will need only 1 or 2 more stringers, although a very wide stairway could require more. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube. Wear gloves and eye protection while operating saws. Helpful 4 Not Helpful 2. Consult with authorities in your area to familiarize yourself what to wear under a sport coat your local building codes.

Comply with local inspections and rules in your area. Helpful 2 Not Helpful 2. Related wikiHows How to. How to. More References 5. About This Article. Co-authored by:.

Deck Stair Stringers Spacing

You will need to remove the thickness of the riser board from the top stair and remove the thickness of the tread board from the bottom stair. You can now draw the notches for the stairs onto your 2x12 stair stringers. The difference between the stair rises and tread depths cannot vary by more than 3/8" from the largest to the smallest.

Last Updated: March 11, References Approved. This article was co-authored by Lui Colmenares. Lui Colmenares is a handyman and licensed home improvement contractor for Mr.

Lui is trained and educated as an industrial engineer and specializes in carpentry, painting, and general handyman work such as mounting TVs, doorknob and deadbolt installation, furniture assembly, tile repair, and grouting. Handy NYC prides itself on quality work performed with speed, skill, and punctuality.

There are 19 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed , times. Stairs are an essential part of many construction projects, from decks to interiors. Treads are the top baseboards onto which you step, and risers are placed perpendicularly under each tread. Measure and cut the stringers accurately, and the other parts will mostly fall into place.

To build stairs, start by cutting the stringers, which are the pieces of wood that run diagonally under the stairs and hold them up.

Then, install the stringers to the top and bottom of the area where you're building the stairs by screwing them into metal joists. Once the stringers are in place, install vertical risers between each step on the stringers. Then, secure the treads to the steps of the stringers, which is what you'll actually be stepping on when you use the stairs. Finally, apply a varnish, paint, or seal to the stairs to protect them against wear and tear. If you want to learn how to calculate how many steps you need for your stairs, keep reading the article!

Did this summary help you? Yes No. Log in Social login does not work in incognito and private browsers. Please log in with your username or email to continue. No account yet? Create an account. Edit this Article. We use cookies to make wikiHow great.

By using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Cookie Settings. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Download Article Explore this Article parts. Tips and Warnings. Things You'll Need. Related Articles. Article Summary. Part 1 of Measure the height of the area where you will install the stairs.

This is also called the total rise. If you want the stairs to stop 3 inches 7. Divide the total rise by the typical rise per step. This will give you the total number of steps on your stairs. The typical rise per step is about 6. Round down to get the number of steps: Divide the total rise by the number of steps to get the actual rise per step.

Remember this will probably be slightly different than the typical rise height. Finding the actual rise per step will ensure that your steps are all the same height, no matter what your overall rise is.

On your stringer, each step will rise 7. Establish the run of each step. The run tread width of each step should be no less than 9 inches 23 cm and realistically at least 10 inches 25 cm.

This allows enough space for the average foot to step comfortably and safely. So, if your riser is 7 inches 18 cm tall, your tread should be anywhere from 9—11 inches 23—28 cm long. Find the total run of the staircase. The total run is the horizontal distance the stairs will travel from beginning to end.

To find this, simply multiply the total number of steps by the run of each step. Decide if your stairs need landings. The longest boards suitable for building stairs will probably be 16 feet 4. This means you will probably max out at about every 14 steps. If your stairs have a long rise and run, you can install landings. However, you can install landings on any staircase, if you prefer. If your staircase will have landings, consider each section of stairs as its own mini staircase.

Calculate the length of the stringers. The stringers are the pieces of wood that will run diagonally underneath the length of the steps to hold them up.

These are what your risers and treads will eventually be attached to. Determine their length the same way you determine the hypotenuse of a right triangle in geometry: [6] X Research source Multiply the horizontal length run by itself, multiply the height by itself, and add the two results together. Then, find the square root of this sum.

Determine how you will attach the stairs to the existing structure. If the stairs will sit flush with the vertical face of the structure, attach your stringers to the existing framework.

Instead, make the total rise slightly shorter and attach support posts to the top of the stringers. Count how many stringers you will need. To prevent your steps from sagging or bowing as you step on them, a wide staircase will need plenty of stringers underneath to keep it evenly supported. Wider staircases are generally preferable to narrower ones because they are much easier and more comfortable to navigate. Part 2 of It will sit at an angle that depends on the height and depth of your steps, and the ends will have to be modified.

Mark a carpenter's square to the height and depth of your steps. In our example, you would need to mark it at 7. Be sure you know which side corresponds with the height riser and which side corresponds with the depth tread.

Modify the top of the stringer to account for the overall angle. This angle will depend on the size of your steps. Lay the side marking the height along the end of the lumber and the side marking the step depth along the length of the lumber.

Draw a line between the step-height and step-depth marks. This line marks the horizontal top of your stringer. Mark the line so that its length is equivalent to the depth of one stair. Use the square to draw a perpendicular line from the end of the board to the spot you just marked. Cut along these lines. Measure and mark each step along the piece of lumber. Using the horizontal top of the stringer as a reference point, measure and draw a line down a distance equal to the height of one step.

Then measure and draw a line across a distance equal to the depth of the step. Use a circular saw or hand saw to cut the step notches. If using a circular power saw, cut to the edge of the marks on the stringers.

Square off the bottom of the stringer so that it will sit flush with the ground. Draw a line parallel to the top of the last step notch, and perpendicular to the side of it where the bottom riser will eventually go. Cut this away to make the bottom of the stringer flush with the ground. Test the stringer by setting it in place. Cut the top and bottom of the stringer to fit, then test-fit it before cutting it out.

Make sure the height is accurate. The stringer should sit flush with the ground or floor and also with the point at the top where it will attach to the existing structure. Use the first stringer as a template off of which to base the next stringers.

Then cut as necessary. Part 3 of Install the stringers. There are many ways to attach the tops of the stringers to the structure. One easy way is to screw metal joist hangers to the floor joists or deck supports.

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